A Regional Crisis

Venezuela’s declining political and socioeconomic situation continues to spark violence and limit many citizens’ access to basic goods and services. More than 5 million people have migrated, most of whom remain in Latin America and the Caribbean. This has created an unprecedented humanitarian and economic challenge for the region. Public infrastructure cannot keep up and local citizens are concerned about limited resources. Moreover, once Venezuelan migrants meet their immediate needs such as housing and medical care, they face longer-term challenges like integrating into communities where they have settled.

A map of South America shows that IAF grantees are currently working with Venezuelan migrants in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Brazil. It also shows two countries where the IAF is starting to fund projects supporting Venezuelan migrants: Chile and Argentina.

The IAF Responds

We tapped our extensive network of more than 750 experienced community-based organizations to support projects addressing longer-term needs of Venezuelan migrants and communities where they live. We invested $4.8 million in our 24 grantee partners in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago. These grantees encourage social and economic inclusion of displaced Venezuelans by:

  • increasing opportunities to earn income
  • combating xenophobia
  • promoting conflict resolution
  • facilitating access to health and psychosocial services

In 2021, we will continue funding more organizations in these countries and expand support to communities in Uruguay.

A Regional Crisis

Venezuela’s declining political and socioeconomic situation continues to spark violence and limit many citizens’ access to basic goods and services. Approximately 5 million people have migrated, most of whom remain in Latin America and the Caribbean. This has created an unprecedented humanitarian and economic challenge for the region. Public infrastructure cannot keep up and local citizens are concerned about limited resources. Moreover, once Venezuelan migrants meet their immediate needs such as housing and medical care, they face longer-term challenges like integrating into communities where they have settled.

The IAF Responds

We tapped our extensive network of more than 750 experienced community-based organizations to support projects addressing longer-term needs of Venezuelan migrants and communities where they live. We invested $1.6 million in our 10 grantee partners in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. These grantees encourage social and economic inclusion of displaced Venezuelans by:

  • increasing opportunities to earn income
  • combating xenophobia
  • promoting conflict resolution
  • facilitating access to health and psychosocial services

In 2020, we will continue funding more organizations in these countries and expand support to communities in Argentina, Chile, and Costa Rica.

A map of South America shows that IAF grantees are currently working with Venezuelan migrants in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Brazil. It also shows two countries where the IAF is starting to fund projects supporting Venezuelan migrants: Chile and Argentina.

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current IAF investment

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people benefitting

complements other U.S. government aid

How Our Grantees Are Helping

Expanding Economic Opportunity

Expanding Economic Opportunity

For example, Cooperativa de Ahorro y Crédito Mujeres Unidas, a women’s saving and loan association in Ecuador, provides Venezuelan migrants and local Ecuadorians small business development training, mentorship, and networking opportunities, as well as access to credit for creating and improving small businesses.

Combating Xenophobia

Combating Xenophobia

For instance, grantee partner Acción y Desarrollo is creating a solidarity network in a low-income area of Lima, Peru, made up of Venezuelan migrants, local business owners, and representatives of public entities to promote Venezuelans’ rights and integration into society.

Reducing Human Trafficking

Reducing Human Trafficking

Grantee partner Fundación Desarrollo y Paz (Fundepaz) educates Venezuelan migrants in the department of Nariño, Colombia, to understand the country’s legal system and trains local government agencies and businesses to recognize, respond to, and reduce cases of labor exploitation and human trafficking.

Projects serving Venezuelan migrants

ordered by most recently awarded

2021-01-19T14:42:27-05:00

2016-ProDialogo

Prodiálogo, Prevención y Resolución de Conflictos (ProDiálogo) engages young people in the use of urban art, dialogue and collaboration as strategies to prevent violence.

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2021-01-18T22:19:54-05:00

2014-COOPERACCION

COOPERACCION - Acción Solidaria para el Desarrollo (COOPERACCION) provides technical assistance to artisans and harvesters to produce native grasses, diversify their crafts, increase their output and sales, and preserve the wetlands

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2021-01-18T21:53:50-05:00

2014-Minka

Minka Trujillo (Minka) improves farmers’ production of organic foods for sale to consumers, merchants and upscale restaurants through Minka’s marketing arm, MINKA VERDE.

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2021-01-18T21:09:39-05:00

2013-Kallpa

Asociación Kallpa para la Promoción de la Salud Integral y el Desarrollo (Kallpa) helps people between the ages of 15 and 29 find meaningful employment or start small businesses through the Center for Youth and Employment and Youth Business Incubators.

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